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Exciting new evidence for an effective therapeutic intervention for older adopted children

Posted in: News

New research by Family Futures, to be published in the Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, November 2019, provides supporting evidence that a therapeutic intervention which is neuro-developmental and holistic in approach improved outcomes for children who had experienced developmental trauma and who had later been placed for adoption.

There is substantial evidence regarding the life-long impact of early maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on health and social prospects, mental health, violence, criminality and poor engagement in education. Children who have been maltreated and subsequently fostered or adopted are more likely than others to have been subject to ACEs prior to their removal into care.

There is limited published research, however, that indicates what is effective in treating older adopted children who have experienced maltreatment and sustained trauma in their birth families. This study is the first to compare outcomes for adopted young people who received an integrated multidisciplinary treatment intervention with those who were recommended the approach at assessment but were unable to receive it (mostly due to funding restrictions).

Family Futures’ neuro-sequential and multidisciplinary treatment model, NPP (Neuro-Physiological Psychotherapy), is informed by neuroscientific research on the impact of maltreatment on the developing child and by therapeutic models such as Ayres Sensory Integration, Theraplay and Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP). Alongside regular NPP family therapy sessions the model supports applications of its principles at home, school and in the wider family network.  In doing this NPP provides wrap-around therapeutic support for adoptive families and children in alternative care settings.

Dr Elaine McCullough, author of the research said:

“This is currently the strongest evidence for a therapeutic intervention for adopted children who have experienced developmental trauma. The results indicate the potential far-reaching improvements the NPP model can have for adoptive families. However, the findings have also highlighted the detrimental consequences for some families of not receiving appropriate support.

Therapeutic interventions need to influence all aspects of the child’s system to improve outcomes and long-term impact. It is important that health, education and social care provide consistent and joined-up support for children and their adoptive families. This support should be informed by neuroscientific research on maltreated children and acknowledge the impact of developmental trauma on the underlying neurological and physiological aspects of their emotional, cognitive and behavioural presentation.”

These research findings are consistent with the recent Adoption Support Fund study (Gieve, Hahne and King, 2019) which concluded that although moderate improvements were found from interventions offered through the ASF, there is a need for wider support than traditional individual therapy, to support children with complex underlying difficulties. It is hoped that this research can inform policy and practice in effective support for children who have experienced maltreatment, abuse, neglect, and/or Adverse Childhood Experiences.

The full research article was published in Child Abuse & Neglect97, 104128: McCullough, E., & Mathura, A. (2019). A comparison between a Neuro-Physiological Psychotherapy (NPP) treatment group and a control group for children adopted from care: Support for a neurodevelopmentally informed approach to therapeutic intervention with maltreated children Child Abuse & Neglect97, 104128.

You can also read further information about the research findings here

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