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Acting Out – a creative arts event in support of adopted young people

Join us for an inspiring range of performances in support of the Young People’s Forum

Tickets are now on sale for Acting Out – in support of adopted young people. The event will showcase an exciting range of creative arts performed by Forum supporters, members and outside professionals who have kindly donated their time.

Join us on Saturday 27 October to watch an inspiring range of performers – a professional dancer (Asmara), a filmmaker (Shabazz), a rapper (Malachi) and more. There will be Q&A sessions with performers and a chance to meet up with other young people at the event.

Tickets are £5 each and funds raised will go back into to the Young People’s Forum so that we can continue to fund activities and workshops for our young people.

Venue: The Rosemary Branch Theatre, 2 Shepperton Rd, London N1 3DT
Date: Saturday 27 October
Time: 11.30am

Book your tickets here:   Book now
and find out more about the event and performers here.

Family Futures rated Outstanding by Ofsted, 2018

“A nationally recognised centre of excellence for therapeutic adoption and adoption support services”

Family Futures has been rated ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted (August 2018) for the third time in a row and under the new, more robust Ofsted inspection framework. Ofsted recognised that:

“The agency is a nationally recognised centre of excellence for therapeutic adoption and adoption support services which address the damage caused by early developmental trauma. The agency has developed its own highly effective therapeutic model over many years, which has been externally evaluated.”

“Children and their families receive holistic care of exceptional quality, which results in excellent experiences, outcomes and progress.”

Read Ofsted’s 2018 report here

Alan Burnell, Family Futures’ Registered Manager, comments on our Outstanding Ofsted rating, 2018:

Modelling a better future for families   

If 20 years of helping families heal is a crowning achievement, then the jewels in our crown are this summer’s Ofsted inspection and our recent round of research. We are very proud that for the third inspection in a row and under the new, more robust Ofsted inspection framework we once again have been judged as Outstanding. One of the criteria of the inspection framework is ‘how well children, young people and adults are helped and protected’. This was judged to be Outstanding. The inspectors reached this conclusion in part because of our research programme. Read More…

New report evaluates adoption and post-adoption services

Realistic Positivity: understanding the additional needs of young children placed for adoption, and supporting families when needs are unexpected

This research by the Council for Disabled Children explores support for adopted children and their families in relation to special educational needs, disability and health. Interviews with parents and professionals are considered alongside policy and available evidence.

Alan Burnell, Registered Manager at Family Futures comments on the report:

It’s refreshing to read an independent report that evaluates current adoption and post-adoption services with a fresh pair of eyes. Sadly those eyes see many of the same shortcomings that Family Futures has identified as a result of our work in the field of adoption.

We very much support the findings from the parent interviews which once again highlight the need for comprehensive, developmental, multidisciplinary assessments of children prior to placement, as well as the need for a post-adoption support service that has the expertise to meet those needs.

We realise that some adoptive parents and professionals may balk at the idea of labelling adopted children as ‘disabled’. At Family Futures we have said from the outset 20 years ago, that the majority of adopted children, because of early adversity, neglect and abuse, have  ‘invisible special needs’ at the point of placement. Neuroscience has confirmed this and the label of developmental trauma is now used to describe their developmental challenges. Labelling children does not define their limitations but should be used to shine a light on what their needs really are and how they can be met.

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