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New Professional Development and Parent Education programme 2019 

Family Futures 2019 training – now available to book online

“Extremely inspiring. I really cannot wait to start the preparation and use the resources and strategies of the course to start Life Story work.”
Our training this year for professionals, parents, carers and special guardians is based on our research, and clinical practice. All our trainers have specialist knowledge, expertise and experience of child development and will focus on giving you practical tips and techniques to use and share with others. Have a look at our list of courses for 2019 below and click on the title link to find out more or to book your place.

Parent education training can be funded by the Adoption Support Fund. You need to make an application through your local authority adoption support service for this funding. If you have any queries about booking training, please contact Claire on 020 7354 4161 or email us.

From Hindsight to Mindsight – the practical application of the neuro-sequential,  NPP approach to the everyday practice of working with Developmentally Traumatised Children
14, 15, 16 & 30 May 2019
For social workers, therapists and psychologists
 Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Level Two
4 to 7 February 2019
For therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists and social workers. Dr Dan Hughes will deliver this training on his treatment model which involves working with a child and their family to improve attachment relationships.
Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Level One
11 to 14 November 2019        Trainer: Dr Dan Hughes

  Trainers are UK-based & Certified Theraplay therapists, supervisors and trainers. Theraplay courses are for psychologists and psychiatrists, occupational therapists, social workers, speech and language therapists, counsellors, adoption and post-adoption counsellors, family therapists, early childhood & developmental specialists and teachers.

Theraplay Level One and Group Theraplay
1 to 5 April 2019

Group Theraplay
2 to 3 May 2019

Theraplay Level Two
25 to 27 November 2019

 Therapeutic Life Story Work
23 to 25 April 2019
For social workers working with adopted and Looked After children
 Siblings Together or Apart
7 to 8 May 2019
Social workers in Looked After children, fostering and adoption teams; adoption and fostering team managers; clinical psychologists, paediatric occupational therapists, therapists, solicitors, panel members, adoption support agency service providers, psychiatrists, paediatricians and teachers

 The Great Behaviour Breakdown. Bryan Post’s follow up to Beyond Consequences

3, 4 & 18 June 2019
For adoptive parents, prospective adopters awaiting placements, foster carers, social workers (Adoption, Fostering), teachers, health visitors, parents of abused/traumatised children.

 

Festive season services from us

Contacting Family Futures over Christmas

Family Futures is closed from 5pm on Friday 21st December 2018 to 9am on Tuesday 2nd January 2019. If you are a family in treatment with Family Futures and have a serious emergency or crisis during this time and you think that the crisis requires the emergency services, we suggest you call them first. You can then ring into Family Futures on the main number 0207 354 4161. On the days when the office is closed a Duty Manager is available between 10am and 5pm. On working days you can contact a Duty Manager between 5 – 9 pm. If when you ring in, you then press 3 as instructed on the answerphone message, it will divert your call to the Duty manager’s mobile. Please leave a message with your name, number and why you are calling and the Duty Manager will call you back as soon as possible. We hope however that you have an enjoyable Christmas and New Year.

Our Occupational Therapy Team have put together some ideas for sensory activities with children and tips for the festive season

Family Futures Sensory Christmas activities

Click here for the full list of sensory activities and tips for the festive season 

Create a sensory Christmas bottle with your child

Spotting the hidden items can have a calming effect at night time.

Fill a plastic bottle with glitter glue (1/3) and add some small beads, stars, glitter, letters, marbles, small plastic animals etc. Fill it up with water. Use hot glue to shut the lid.

Make your own decoration

Great to encourage fine motor and praxis skills, and the pipe cleaners provide tactile stimulation.

You will need: Various beads and pipe cleaners. Place three pipe cleaner strands overlapping. Fix them in the middle with a small piece of pipe cleaner. Parents can also prepare the star shapes and help their children. Have fun putting the beads on the rays. Encourage the child to work in patterns. Tie an additional thread around it and decorate your tree or your room with it!

            

 

Alan Burnell’s blog – December 2018

Key messages from our 2018 Conference

Many good things came out of the conference ‘Assessing and Treating Developmentally Traumatised Children’ in October. Colwyn Trevarthen, our keynote speaker, reminded us all how important the first few weeks and months of a baby’s life are. What really struck home to me was his point that babies from the outset are intentional. They want to relate, they need to relate and they have a way of relating in-built that is musical in nature. Read Alan’s blog here.

Do you have an interest in or personal experience of adoption?

Would you consider joining our Adoption Panel?

We’re looking to increase numbers of Independent Panel Members available to attend our Adoption Panel. The aim of the Panel is to ensure we have carried out a thorough assessment of prospective adopters, in order to find the best possible parents for children in need of a permanent home. The role is an interesting, responsible and at times challenging one. To find out more information, visit our Join Us page.

Acting Out – a creative arts event in support of adopted young people

Join us for an inspiring range of performances in support of the Young People’s Forum

Tickets are now on sale for Acting Out – in support of adopted young people. The event will showcase an exciting range of creative arts performed by Forum supporters, members and outside professionals who have kindly donated their time.

Join us on Saturday 27 October to watch an inspiring range of performers – a professional dancer (Asmara), a filmmaker (Shabazz), a rapper (Malachi) and more. There will be Q&A sessions with performers and a chance to meet up with other young people at the event.

Tickets are £5 each and funds raised will go back into to the Young People’s Forum so that we can continue to fund activities and workshops for our young people.

Venue: The Rosemary Branch Theatre, 2 Shepperton Rd, London N1 3DT
Date: Saturday 27 October
Time: 11.30am

Book your tickets here:   Book now
and find out more about the event and performers here.

Family Futures rated Outstanding by Ofsted, 2018

“A nationally recognised centre of excellence for therapeutic adoption and adoption support services”

Family Futures has been rated ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted (August 2018) for the third time in a row and under the new, more robust Ofsted inspection framework. Ofsted recognised that:

“The agency is a nationally recognised centre of excellence for therapeutic adoption and adoption support services which address the damage caused by early developmental trauma. The agency has developed its own highly effective therapeutic model over many years, which has been externally evaluated.”

“Children and their families receive holistic care of exceptional quality, which results in excellent experiences, outcomes and progress.”

Read Ofsted’s 2018 report here

Alan Burnell, Family Futures’ Registered Manager, comments on our Outstanding Ofsted rating, 2018:

Modelling a better future for families   

If 20 years of helping families heal is a crowning achievement, then the jewels in our crown are this summer’s Ofsted inspection and our recent round of research. We are very proud that for the third inspection in a row and under the new, more robust Ofsted inspection framework we once again have been judged as Outstanding. One of the criteria of the inspection framework is ‘how well children, young people and adults are helped and protected’. This was judged to be Outstanding. The inspectors reached this conclusion in part because of our research programme. Read More…

New report evaluates adoption and post-adoption services

Realistic Positivity: understanding the additional needs of young children placed for adoption, and supporting families when needs are unexpected

This research by the Council for Disabled Children explores support for adopted children and their families in relation to special educational needs, disability and health. Interviews with parents and professionals are considered alongside policy and available evidence.

Alan Burnell, Registered Manager at Family Futures comments on the report:

It’s refreshing to read an independent report that evaluates current adoption and post-adoption services with a fresh pair of eyes. Sadly those eyes see many of the same shortcomings that Family Futures has identified as a result of our work in the field of adoption.

We very much support the findings from the parent interviews which once again highlight the need for comprehensive, developmental, multidisciplinary assessments of children prior to placement, as well as the need for a post-adoption support service that has the expertise to meet those needs.

We realise that some adoptive parents and professionals may balk at the idea of labelling adopted children as ‘disabled’. At Family Futures we have said from the outset 20 years ago, that the majority of adopted children, because of early adversity, neglect and abuse, have  ‘invisible special needs’ at the point of placement. Neuroscience has confirmed this and the label of developmental trauma is now used to describe their developmental challenges. Labelling children does not define their limitations but should be used to shine a light on what their needs really are and how they can be met.

Alan Burnell, Registered Manager comments on new research on Child to Parent Violence and Aggression

CPVA – a major problem that needs to be addressed to prevent unnecessary disruptions

A Summary of the Let’s Talk About: Child to Parent Violence and Aggression (CPVA) 2018 Survey report by Dr W Thorley and Al Coates MBE is now available to download. The findings were highlighted by an ITV News broadcast this week: six in ten families living with child on parent violence experience daily attacks. 538 families across the country took part and 53% of the sample were adoptive parents, foster carers, kinship carers or guardians. Alan Burnell, our Registered Manager comments on the findings:

“This is an important report highlighting a major problem that has been around for some time but has slipped under the social policy radar. Child to Parent Violence and Aggression has many causes as the report says. For adopted and fostered children we know from our experience that in the majority of cases this is a consequence of early child abuse and neglect, and needs a robust therapeutic response from placing agencies. The government should prioritise the Adoption Support Fund to help address this issue if they want to prevent unnecessary disruptions.”

Moving from Significant Harm to Significant Help

New Family Futures Fact Sheet – The impact of Significant Harm

Download The impact of Significant Harm Fact Sheet here.

Most children placed for adoption today have been removed from their birth families because of “significant harm”. The significant harm they have suffered causes significant harm to their subsequent development, as evidenced by neuroscientific research. Understanding and assessing the impact of significant harm will inform what support or therapeutic intervention is needed to address these developmental issues.

Alan Burnell, Registered Manager at Family Futures said:

“By taking significant harm as our starting point we are beginning to tackle the epicentre of developmental trauma, rather than forever trying to manage the aftershocks.

We need to move from seeing adoption support as helping families in crisis to seeing it as developmental repair.  Let’s help children move from significant harm to significant help.”

 

 

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